Scarlet Fever Llanelli Rugby Sport Wales Tickets Homepage
Forum Home Forum Home > RUGBY > GENERAL RUGBY
  New Posts New Posts
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Register Register  Login Login


Gum guard sensor trial

 Post Reply Post Reply
Author
Message
Wil Chips View Drop Down
Rambler
Rambler
Avatar

Joined: 23 August 2009
Location: Africa
Status: Offline
Points: 41406
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Wil Chips Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Gum guard sensor trial
    Posted: 06 January 2019 at 11:33am
There was a quick reference to this in yesterday’s Ospreys v Blues game.

Players were all wearing a specially adapted gum guard that had sensors that measured head impact in some way ( I think when a head has contact it measures the reflex of the head/neck).

Data transmitted to the medical staff ‘live’.

Anyone know more about this?


Edited by Wil Chips - 06 January 2019 at 2:36pm
Back to Top
Sponsored Links


Back to Top
Ffidel Bennett View Drop Down
Veteran
Veteran


Joined: 31 August 2014
Location: Caerdydd
Status: Offline
Points: 5654
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Ffidel Bennett Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 January 2019 at 1:48pm
Originally posted by Wil Chips Wil Chips wrote:

There was a quick reference to this in yesterday’s Ospreys v Blues game.

Players were all wearing a specially adapted gun guard that had sensors that measured head impact in some way ( I think when a head has contact it measures the reflex of the head/neck).

Data transmitted to the medical staff ‘live’.

Anyone know more about this?
 

Is it any wonder there are so many injuries when guns are allowed on the pitch?  Wink

Saw that the gum shield sensors measure sudden impacts- accelerations/deccelerations , but don't know how it differentiates between a head impact and the whole body coming to a sudden stop in a strong tackle.
Back to Top
Wil Chips View Drop Down
Rambler
Rambler
Avatar

Joined: 23 August 2009
Location: Africa
Status: Offline
Points: 41406
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Wil Chips Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 January 2019 at 2:37pm
Oops. Fixed.
Back to Top
Nikostratos View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member


Joined: 24 July 2005
Status: Offline
Points: 338
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Nikostratos Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 January 2019 at 12:59am
Originally posted by Ffidel Bennett Ffidel Bennett wrote:

Originally posted by Wil Chips Wil Chips wrote:

There was a quick reference to this in yesterday’s Ospreys v Blues game.

Players were all wearing a specially adapted gun guard that had sensors that measured head impact in some way ( I think when a head has contact it measures the reflex of the head/neck).

Data transmitted to the medical staff ‘live’.

Anyone know more about this?
 

Is it any wonder there are so many injuries when guns are allowed on the pitch?  Wink

Saw that the gum shield sensors measure sudden impacts- accelerations/deccelerations , but don't know how it differentiates between a head impact and the whole body coming to a sudden stop in a strong tackle.


I could be wrong, Ffidel, I'm not a doctor, but I  suspect that extreme, sudden deceleration could cause a contre-coup brain injury. The body, including skull, stops.  The brain continues to move forward and hits the inside of the skull, rather like a passenger in a car that brakes suddenly.  Even with blows to the head, it's not the direct contact that does most of  the damage, it's the contre-coup.  That's why head protection is no use in preventing concussion.  I don't know if a 'big hit' is enough to have that effect, but it wouldn't surprise me if it were. 
If not, they'll be able to see the type of contact and react appropriately, I would think.
Back to Top
reesytheexile View Drop Down
Veteran
Veteran
Avatar

Joined: 11 August 2012
Location: Machynys
Status: Offline
Points: 12425
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote reesytheexile Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 January 2019 at 9:43am
We shall end up with 25  men match-day squads at this rate or more to reflect HIA factors
"I'd rather have been a judge than a miner.Being a miner,as soon as you are too old and tired and sick and stupid to do the job properly,you have to go.The very opposite applies with judges!"P.Cook
Back to Top
Sosban bach View Drop Down
Veteran
Veteran
Avatar

Joined: 15 September 2012
Location: Obvious!
Status: Online
Points: 4977
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Sosban bach Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 January 2019 at 10:00am
Originally posted by Nikostratos Nikostratos wrote:

Originally posted by Ffidel Bennett Ffidel Bennett wrote:

Originally posted by Wil Chips Wil Chips wrote:

There was a quick reference to this in yesterday’s Ospreys v Blues game.

Players were all wearing a specially adapted gun guard that had sensors that measured head impact in some way ( I think when a head has contact it measures the reflex of the head/neck).

Data transmitted to the medical staff ‘live’.

Anyone know more about this?
 

Is it any wonder there are so many injuries when guns are allowed on the pitch?  Wink

Saw that the gum shield sensors measure sudden impacts- accelerations/deccelerations , but don't know how it differentiates between a head impact and the whole body coming to a sudden stop in a strong tackle.


I could be wrong, Ffidel, I'm not a doctor, but I  suspect that extreme, sudden deceleration could cause a contre-coup brain injury. The body, including skull, stops.  The brain continues to move forward and hits the inside of the skull, rather like a passenger in a car that brakes suddenly.  Even with blows to the head, it's not the direct contact that does most of  the damage, it's the contre-coup.  That's why head protection is no use in preventing concussion.  I don't know if a 'big hit' is enough to have that effect, but it wouldn't surprise me if it were. 
If not, they'll be able to see the type of contact and react appropriately, I would think.

Although they might want to wear them for the ears but yea as far as protection from concussion I don’t think they will have any real benefit.
Back to Top
reesytheexile View Drop Down
Veteran
Veteran
Avatar

Joined: 11 August 2012
Location: Machynys
Status: Offline
Points: 12425
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote reesytheexile Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 January 2019 at 10:02am
Originally posted by Sosban bach Sosban bach wrote:

Originally posted by Nikostratos Nikostratos wrote:

Originally posted by Ffidel Bennett Ffidel Bennett wrote:

Originally posted by Wil Chips Wil Chips wrote:

There was a quick reference to this in yesterday’s Ospreys v Blues game.

Players were all wearing a specially adapted gun guard that had sensors that measured head impact in some way ( I think when a head has contact it measures the reflex of the head/neck).

Data transmitted to the medical staff ‘live’.

Anyone know more about this?
 

Is it any wonder there are so many injuries when guns are allowed on the pitch?  Wink

Saw that the gum shield sensors measure sudden impacts- accelerations/deccelerations , but don't know how it differentiates between a head impact and the whole body coming to a sudden stop in a strong tackle.


I could be wrong, Ffidel, I'm not a doctor, but I  suspect that extreme, sudden deceleration could cause a contre-coup brain injury. The body, including skull, stops.  The brain continues to move forward and hits the inside of the skull, rather like a passenger in a car that brakes suddenly.  Even with blows to the head, it's not the direct contact that does most of  the damage, it's the contre-coup.  That's why head protection is no use in preventing concussion.  I don't know if a 'big hit' is enough to have that effect, but it wouldn't surprise me if it were. 
If not, they'll be able to see the type of contact and react appropriately, I would think.

Although they might want to wear them for the ears but yea as far as protection from concussion I don’t think they will have any real benefit.
"I'd rather have been a judge than a miner.Being a miner,as soon as you are too old and tired and sick and stupid to do the job properly,you have to go.The very opposite applies with judges!"P.Cook
Back to Top
Rob o'r Bont View Drop Down
Veteran
Veteran
Avatar

Joined: 03 May 2008
Location: Bont
Status: Online
Points: 11717
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Rob o'r Bont Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 January 2019 at 10:03am
As the teeth and skull are more or less one, I think measuring the acceleration/deceleration of the teeth must give a good indication of how the skull moves and hence a good indication of the impact on the brain.  I thought it amusing (for some reason) that a light flashed in the gum shield when a certain level of impact was measured. Wales v England matches would light up like a lazer show if everyone wore them.

Edited by Rob o'r Bont - 11 January 2019 at 10:04am
That's the Scarlets, its in their DNA.
Back to Top
reesytheexile View Drop Down
Veteran
Veteran
Avatar

Joined: 11 August 2012
Location: Machynys
Status: Offline
Points: 12425
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote reesytheexile Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 January 2019 at 10:13am
This is seemingly taking injuries to the head into a wider testing area of head motion movements in addition to those clear incidents where you can see direct contact (blow) to the head. I am not sure what actually triggers the device but it seems like it is either a blow to the mouth or it may just measure head rocking motion? However, it now seems we shall be monitoring the 'whiplash' effect which is likely to pick up a new crop of injuries which at present go unobserved. You can have a whiplash in car accidents at speeds as low as about 7-10 mph (although obviously a typical accident shunt is at a higher speed than that) ,so whilst it will be good for player welfare , this is bound to change the game yet again -larger playing squads for sure for replacements with higher wage costs for starters. Interesting times...
"I'd rather have been a judge than a miner.Being a miner,as soon as you are too old and tired and sick and stupid to do the job properly,you have to go.The very opposite applies with judges!"P.Cook
Back to Top
Rob o'r Bont View Drop Down
Veteran
Veteran
Avatar

Joined: 03 May 2008
Location: Bont
Status: Online
Points: 11717
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Rob o'r Bont Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 January 2019 at 10:54am
I'm no expert but I suspect it doesn't pick up whiplash per se. I imagine you can get whiplash without triggering the sort of impact to the brain that would cause concussion.  
That's the Scarlets, its in their DNA.
Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down

Forum Software by Web Wiz Forums® version 11.04
Copyright ©2001-2015 Web Wiz Ltd.

This page was generated in 0.063 seconds.