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Llanelli Colloquialisms

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Mrfwon View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Mrfwon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 March 2013 at 2:27pm
Originally posted by Mister Jolly Mister Jolly wrote:

Originally posted by Mrfwon Mrfwon wrote:

As a kid, everything was "Down line" if you went somewhere Confused as in, we're off out for the day today, going down line. I never knew where down line was, but everything seemed to be down there.   
 
 
 
That's railway terminology.  Anywhere away from London is "downline" and conversely towards London is "upline"  Where there's a two line track, the railwaymen refer to these as the 'upline' and the 'downline' tracks.
 
You must have travelled West a lot as a kid  Smile
 
 
HAHA If only my parents explained this to me as a child, I'd be far better for it now! LOLLOLLOL The confusion must have been that we were going in the car and not on a train, but still, I hold my parents responsible for not educating me correctly! LOLLOLLOL
 
Yes, we did used to head 'downline' to places like Pendine, Tenby, Saundersfoot, Amroth beach quite often during the summer months when I lived in Llanelli as a child, but most summer days were spent down Pembrey Country Park.............awesome down there mun! ClapClapClap
 
Here is another too, does anyone still use "Slaps all round" when someone is winding you up? LOL "There'll be slaps all round in a minute!" LOLLOLLOL
 
and, Llanelli folk have a funny way of adding the word 'after' on to sentances that have 'now' in them too. For example,
 
"I'll fix in now after" or "are you going now after" LOLLOLLOL
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Mister Jolly View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Mister Jolly Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 March 2013 at 11:12pm
or:
 
"I'll do it now, in a minute"
 
LOL
Just because my second name's Jolly, it doesn't mean I have to be jolly all the ****ing time

Jolly Tours - A jolly time for all (just keep away from the fountains)
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 9331101972 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 March 2013 at 10:22am
Originally posted by Mister Jolly Mister Jolly wrote:

or:
 

"I'll do it now, in a minute"

 

LOL


Havin' a spell are you?
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Mister Jolly View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Mister Jolly Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 March 2013 at 4:07pm
Originally posted by 9331101972 9331101972 wrote:


Havin' a spell are you?
 
I was with a couple of Sais on holiday last year and when I said, "let's stop here for a spell", they thought we were going to have a game of cricket!
Just because my second name's Jolly, it doesn't mean I have to be jolly all the ****ing time

Jolly Tours - A jolly time for all (just keep away from the fountains)
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote roy munster Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 March 2013 at 4:14pm
mun? is that even a word?its sort of added on to the end of a sentence just to add some additional moaniness.
 
eg..."those english forwards were killing the ball all day and were well offside at every ruck...mun"
 
works a treatApprove
ROYMOND MUNTER MBE (FOR SERVICES TO THE COMBOVER)
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Mister Jolly Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 March 2013 at 6:28pm
Originally posted by roy munster roy munster wrote:

mun? is that even a word?its sort of added on to the end of a sentence just to add some additional moaniness.
 
eg..."those english forwards were killing the ball all day and were well offside at every ruck...mun"
 
works a treatApprove
 
Used beyond Llanelli though, Roy, as are 'by here', 'by there' and 'like'
 
LOL
Just because my second name's Jolly, it doesn't mean I have to be jolly all the ****ing time

Jolly Tours - A jolly time for all (just keep away from the fountains)
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Mister Jolly Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 March 2013 at 6:37pm
"like that" or as it's more commonly pronounced "like 'at" as in:
 
"I went down the pub, like 'at, I was having a shant, like 'at, then Dai came in, like 'at....."
 
Like what??? Confused
Just because my second name's Jolly, it doesn't mean I have to be jolly all the ****ing time

Jolly Tours - A jolly time for all (just keep away from the fountains)
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 9331101972 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 March 2013 at 6:54pm
'Sanferryann isn't it' was common when I lived in Llanelli. It meant 'it doesn't matter' or 'so what' or it makes very little difference. I've spelt it phonetically as I've never seen it written down. Apparently it started when our soldiers came back from France after the First World War. So the story goes they had heard the French saying 'ce ne fait rien' and it was repeated by our lads as best they could and it became 'sanferryann'.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote scarletginna Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 March 2013 at 7:14pm
When someone has a drink or some food and you want to "scrub" the leftovers you would say "give me boneys then!" If it was a drink you had to ask them first to "drink your dregs"
Every time Ref!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 9331101972 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 March 2013 at 1:45pm
"It's domino then". It's over, we've had it: we've lost: we're beaten. This was a common phrase in Llanelli long before President Eisenhower expressed his concern about the spread of communism as "the domino theory".
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Mrfwon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 April 2013 at 12:35pm
Originally posted by scarletginna scarletginna wrote:

When someone has a drink or some food and you want to "scrub" the leftovers you would say "give me boneys then!" If it was a drink you had to ask them first to "drink your dregs"
haha, I remember those!!! LOLClapClapClap
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Mrfwon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 April 2013 at 12:38pm
Originally posted by Mister Jolly Mister Jolly wrote:

Originally posted by roy munster roy munster wrote:

mun? is that even a word?its sort of added on to the end of a sentence just to add some additional moaniness.
 
eg..."those english forwards were killing the ball all day and were well offside at every ruck...mun"
 
works a treatApprove
 
Used beyond Llanelli though, Roy, as are 'by here', 'by there' and 'like'
 
LOL
I've been living in England for the past 14 years now, and it still slips out when I'm having a moan or argument with the wife or at work!
 
"[beep] sake, I'll do the dishes in a minute MUN!"
 
"Stop your moaning MUN!"
 
or in work
 
"You were supposed to finish that yesterday, how can I test it now MUN!"
 
Blanked expressions every time!!!! LOLLOLLOLLOLLOL
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote minded Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 September 2015 at 8:54pm
Not sure where this has been hiding in my long term memory but i just used the word "spawny" to describe the French conversion which hit the inside of the post and went over.

Anyone else used to say this when something lucky happened or someone scored a spawny goal or hit a spawny shot in cricket? Don't think i've said it since i was about 12.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote scarletabroad Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 September 2015 at 10:26pm
huh yeah not heard it on my travells in the army or in Saes land now you mention it.....mind you its all TOWIE and chavs here no room for spawny buggers like me......thank GodSmile 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Mrfwon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 January 2016 at 3:49pm
Originally posted by aber-fan aber-fan wrote:

Originally posted by m1nd3d m1nd3d wrote:

Mob in our school meant that someone counted, eyes closed, against a drainpipe at the side of the school and everyone hid. Then once a person had been found, it was a race back to the drainpipe and if you got there first you were safe, but if the counter got there first you were out.

Or I've just made that up, I can't remember Confused


I was taught this game in the 1950s by slightly older kids, living in the Lampeter area - they called it Mob 1-2-3, so you had to shout this out if you successfully sneaked back to the base, whatever that was, without being caught by the 'on' person.

Yup, same rules in the 90's too! Clap Although if you were racing back to the drainpipe, and were going to get beaten, then you ended up tripping the guy up in front, causing him to fall, scuff is clothes, face, arms n all, and then end up fighting. LOLLOLLOL
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Mrfwon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 January 2016 at 3:51pm
Originally posted by aber-fan aber-fan wrote:

Originally posted by Rob o'r Bont Rob o'r Bont wrote:

Niblo.


Meaning? Or is it too rude?

It is real LOL Usually a word used when referencing someone over there that you didn't know. For example "see niblo over there, go and ask him!" LOL
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